BONE BROTH AKA LIQUID GOLD

02/28/2017

BoneBroth_BleubirdMy friend Rebecca impressively makes bone broth every single week. She also happens to be my superhero in the kitchen, making incredible dishes for her family and friends on a daily basis, that could easily be served up in a fancy restaurant. Rebecca, I’ve told you this before, you need to open up your own restaurant one day soon, please and thank you!

My kitchen hero passed along her incredible bone broth recipe to me last year, and it is by far the best I’ve had. I wish I could drink this every day, but I don’t have the discipline to make it regularly. It’s time consuming, but kicks every other bone broth recipe’s ass, at least that I’ve had—both homemade and store bought—and is totally worth the trouble.

I only make bone broth using poultry, since I have Alpha-Gal and cannot eat read meat (more on that later), but I imagine you could use virtually any kind of bones for this recipe. One tip I have: go big or go home! Make a large batch. It’s a lot of work, so the more you make, the more you have and can freeze off for later.

Liquid Gold by Rebecca Branan

Place two chicken carcasses or one turkey carcass—preferably after being roasted in the oven with most of the meat removed, but not all—into a large stock pot, add any juice from roasting pan, as well.

Next, add roasted veggies: 3 whole carrots (with stems); 2 large stalks of celery; a few shallots (halved with skin on); and 4-5 whole garlic cloves. Roast these in the oven (preferably with the chicken or turkey above) and add into the stock pot.

Cover bones and veggies with water (I use filtered) and bring to a low boil. Add two bay leaves, a couple sprigs of fresh parsley and reduce to a simmer for about an hour. Then add a Parmesan rind (optional, but oh-so good!) and a half-inch of tumeric root, unpeeled. Keep the pot on a super-low simmer and leave for about 6 hours more, uncovered, or overnight, partially covered. Add more water anytime the liquid gets too low.

Once your bone broth is ready, let it cool a bit and strain through a large mesh sieve into mason jars, if going into the fridge. If you’ve made more to freeze, place 1-2 servings into strong plastic baggies with some room to expand once frozen. I like to freeze mine laying flat, so they are easy to stack in a freezer drawer until use. To thaw, run a bag under hot water until the frozen broth can be easily poured into a pot for continued thawing—usually a couple of minutes. Heat on stove top, pour, and enjoy.

That’s it! Sounds simple enough, but trust me, it’s kind of a pain and really is time consuming, plus your house will smell like soup, which I’m not mad about, but yeah. Cheers!

6 comments

  • Katy

    Parmesan rind?! Now that’s what I’m talkin about.

    I’ve also heard you should always add a teaspoon of vi what to pull all the good stuff out of the bones. Not sure if that’s legit but you dont taste it, so worth a shot.

  • Amy G.

    This almost makes me want to volunteer to make the turkey again for Friend Thanksgiving! Maybe i’ll just *so* kindly offer to dispose of the carcass…

  • Dana

    Hello James, thanks for the recipie, sounds great. Could you tell me how do you filter your water?

    Warm regards from Berlin. Dana.

  • Erica

    So what are the benefits of bone broth, besides the taste?

  • Julie

    a great dish , i have learnt it. thanks a lot . anyone wanna have it?

Leave a Comment

Please be respectful. Bleubird is a place for positivity, inspiration, constructive criticism and healthy debate. Comments are moderated. Those that are deemed inappropriate, including general or self-promotional spam, untruths, offensive or harassing statements, profanity or comments unrelated to the post will be deleted.

All Content © 2014 Bleubird. All Rights Reserved.
Site designed by Jane Reaction + Developed by Brandi Bernoskie